The law of large numbers is a key integral component to most primary insurance lines of coverage. This law anticipates collecting sufficient premium from all policyholders to cover the losses of the few. Pooling premiums to respond to injury or damage sustained by certain members of that pool is how insurance works.

However, that approach does not necessarily apply to corporate suretyship. The premium for any type of surety bond is not treated as an amount that can be held in reserve to make payments. On the contrary, it should be considered as a fee for the bond. When losses occur, they are paid out of the surety’s assets, surplus investment income, and contingency reserve. After the surety fulfills its obligation, it assumes the principal’s rights, because it has already handled the principal’s financial responsibilities. Once an obligee receives a surety bond, that bond is valid, even if the principal never pays for it. The surety bond does not have any cancellation provisions for nonpayment of premium. In addition, the rights of the obligee cannot be invalidated unless the bond has an express provision that permits it.

If you have questions or need help securing a Surety Bond call us at 800-392-6532.

 

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